Food for Thought: The Hidden Half of Nature

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We picked this book out half a year ago for our series on humankind in the natural world; who knew it would be so relevant?

The Hidden Half of Nature is described as an “ambitious and prodigiously researched book” that presents a “romantic view of the microbial world” by Sonia Shah, a science journalist writing for The New York Times. “At the heart of this delightful book lies the simple belief that microbes have ‘shaped our past and how we treat them will shape our future in ways we are only beginning to understand.’” Publishers Weekly Review “A must-read for avid gardeners, those interested in bolstering our precarious food supply, or anyone remotely concerned about their health and the soil under their feet.” Kirkus Reviews Review “Eye opening … A must for all fascinated by the workings of the body and for those concerned with health care and the environment.” Booklist

April and May Food for Thought book e-discussion will take place on Zoom on Wednesdays, April 8 and May 13, from 6:00-7:00 pm. Send a message for an invitation: info@LitYoungstown.org. May will be a book rec: tell us about 3 books we all should read!

We’ll take the summer off, as usual, and start up in September with a new series by Black authors. Hope you’ll join us.

September (fiction) The Autograph Man by Zadie Smith October (fiction) The Water Dancer by Ta Nehisi Coates November (poetry) Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude by Ross Gay December Any children’s book by a Black author January (short stories) The Thing Around Your Neck by Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche February (fiction) The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead March (fiction) We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo April (speculative fiction) Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler May (fiction) An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

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